Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
Birds of Eden the largest free flight bird aviary in the world, Plettenberg Bay Garden Route Adventures South Africa
Monkeyland and Birds of Eden provides the primates and birds at the sanctuaries with a stable environment, one with permanence and where there is definitely no exploitation.
About our primates









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Glossary
H
Homology

Homology forms the basis of organization for comparative biology. In 1843, Richard Owen defined homology as "the same organ in different animals under every variety of form and function". Organs as different as a bat's wing, a seal's flipper, a cat's paw and a human hand have a common underlying structure of bones and muscles. Owen reasoned that there must be a common structural plan for all vertebrates, as well as for each class of vertebrates.

Homologous traits of organisms are due to sharing a common ancestor, and such traits often have similar embryological origins and development. This is contrasted with analogous traits: similarities between organisms that were not present in the last common ancestor of the taxa being considered but rather evolved separately. An example of analogous traits would be the wings of bats and birds, which evolved separately but both of which evolved from the vertebrate forelimb and therefore have similar early embryology.
 
Whether or not a trait is homologous depends on both the taxonomic and anatomical levels at which the trait is examined. For example, the bird and bat wings are homologous as forearms in tetrapods. However, they are not homologous as wings, because the organ served as a forearm (not a wing) in the last common ancestor of tetrapods. By definition, any homologous trait defines a clade—a monophyletic taxon in which all the members have the trait (or have lost it secondarily); and all non-members lack it.
 
A homologous trait may be homoplasious – that is, it has evolved independently, but from the same ancestral structure – plesiomorphic – that is, present in a common ancestor but secondarily lost in some of its descendants – or (syn)apomorphic – present in an ancestor and all of its descendants.
 
A homologous trait is often called a homolog (also spelled homologue). In genetics, the term "homolog" is used both to refer to a homologous protein, and to the gene (DNA sequence) encoding it.

Habitat

The area where a plant or animal naturally grows or lives.

Hornbills

(Order: Bucerotiformes) Hornbills are large, loud birds with large beaks, often with casques. The 54 species are found in the old world (Africa and Asia). They are found in many different habitats and have a wide diet. They are monogamous; the female seals herself into a tree cavity while she is nesting and relies solely on the male to feed her and the chick.

Hornbills

(Order: Bucerotiformes) Hornbills are large, loud birds with large beaks, often with casques. The 54 species are found in the old world (Africa and Asia). They are found in many different habitats and have a wide diet. They are monogamous; the female seals herself into a tree cavity while she is nesting and relies solely on the male to feed her and the chick.

Hyoid

a U-shaped bone between the base of the tongue and the larynx

Hotspot

The biodiversity hotspots are areas of the world that hold especially high numbers of endemic species and face extreme threats. To qualify as a hotspot, a region must meet two strict criteria: it must contain at least 1,500 species of vascular plants (> 0.5 percent of the world’s total) as endemics, and it has to have lost at least 70 percent of its original habitat. Over 50 percent of the world’s plant species and 42 percent of all terrestrial vertebrate species are endemic to the 34 biodiversity hotspots.

Habitat

The area where a plant or animal naturally grows or lives.

Habituated Group

also: habituate a group of animals that is accustomed to being watched and followed by researchers and that tolerates the presence of humans; this often takes long periods of time (from months to years) to achieve with primates

Hybridization

also: hybridize, hybrid a crossing of individuals of different genetic composition that typically belong to different species

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